October 1

September- October 2017 Food Magazines

Its that time of the year when the leaves are starting to change colour and fall to the ground. The nights are getting colder, the rain is becoming more frequent and on a Sunday all you want to do is snuggle up in bed after eating your belly full of delicious food, and catch up on all your weeks worth of television entertainment.
Days like these I spend cooking up a hearty family meal as well as an extremely naughty and OHH so pleasurable dessert.
I ponder around the kitchen various food programmes on in the background and I have a pile of food magazines close by that I flick through for a catch up on what is going on in the world of food and hospitality. I indulge myself within the sheets of paper finding out all the newest food trends, learning new recipes and cooking techniques, whilst adoring all the fabulous food photography on every page sometimes lusting over the tempting looking dishes.

This month I have been browsing through the pages of Vegan living, a quite new food magazine that focuses on vegan cookery, the clue is very much in the title.

I am not a but i am a foodie so I do like to eat well and expand my cooking repertoire, as far as I am concerned, you do not have to be a vegan to cook and enjoy vegan food. Vegan foods can only do you good. I practice having a balanced food intake, therefore, I do eat meat and fish, however, I eat them in moderation as that is what I conceive as a balanced diet.


Vegan recipes can sometimes be daunting if you are creating baked good such as cakes and pastries as you do have to start using ingredients that you may well never of heard of. Please do not let this put you off one vegan meal a week can open your eyes to a whole new world of amazing foods and ingredients.
There are also other vegan and vegetarian food magazine’s out there, why not give one a try Vegan food and Living
Vegan life is also a great food magazine filled with lots of exciting and tasty dishes check it out.

Lots of foodie luv Dan x

 

 

Its that time of the year when the leaves are starting to change colour and fall to the ground. The nights are getting colder, the rain is becoming more frequent and on a Sunday all you want to do is snuggle up in bed after eating your belly full of delicious food, and catch up on all your weeks worth of television entertainment.
Its that time of the year when the leaves are starting to change colour and fall to the ground. The nights are getting colder, the rain is becoming more frequent and on a Sunday all you want to do is snuggle up in bed after eating your belly full of delicious food, and catch up on all your weeks worth of television entertainment.

the year when the leaves are starting to change colour and fall to the ground. The nights are getting colder, the rain is becoming more frequent and on a Sunday all you want to do is snuggle up in bed after eating your belly full of delicious food, and catch up on all your weeks worth of television entertainment.

Days like these I spend cooking up a hearty family meal as well as  a extremely naughty and OHH so pleasurable dessert.

I ponder around the kitchen  various food programmes on in the back ground and I have a pile of food  magazines close by that I flick through for a catch up on what is going on in the world of food and hospitality. I indulge myself within the sheets of paper finding out all the newest food trends, learning new recipes and  cooking techniques, whilst adoring all the fabulous food photography on every page sometimes lusting over the  tempting looking dishes.

 

This month I have been browsing through the pages of Vegan living, a quite new food magazine that focuses on vegan cookery, clue is very much in the title.

the year when the leaves are starting to change colour and fall to the ground. The nights are getting colder, the rain is becoming more frequent and on a Sunday all you want to do is snuggle up in bed after eating your belly full of delicious food, and catch up on all your weeks worth of television entertainment.

Days like these I spend cooking up a hearty family meal as well as  a extremely naughty and OHH so pleasurable dessert.

I ponder around the kitchen  various food programmes on in the back ground and I have a pile of food  magazines close by that I flick through for a catch up on what is going on in the world of food and hospitality. I indulge myself within the sheets of paper finding out all the newest food trends, learning new recipes and  cooking techniques, whilst adoring all the fabulous food photography on every page sometimes lusting over the  tempting looking dishes.

 

This month I have been browsing through the pages of Vegan living, a quite new food magazine that focuses on vegan cookery, clue is very much in the title.

September 13

Where to eat and drink outside of UWL

Hi guys

Are you looking for somewhere else to eat and drink apart from on campus? Well look no further I have all the information you need.

The Castle is the resident pub directly across from the university, whilst I am not encouraging drinking whilst studying, I do advocate everyone eating well and having some down time.

The Castle has everything you a need in a pub, great food, a wide selection of beverages lots of events such as  Sunday roasts each and every Sunday, Wednesday Tapas & quiz night, Thursday open mic night, Fish and wine Fridays and Saturday live bands night and last but by no means least great friendly staff.

They have a great secret garden that you can enjoy on those hot summer days as well.

Best of all students are offered a free drink after their 6th visit, just ask at the bar for your student discount card where you receive 10% off.

 

September 12

Where to eat and drink outside of campus

The Moon and Maybe is a quaint little cafe situated across from the university on St Mary’s road.

They serve freshly made cakes and bakes as well as great coffees and a range of snacks. They have friendly staff with a warm and welcoming atmosphere.

They have a gorgeous garden in which you can relax on beautiful sunny days.

Pop in and say hello 

56 St Mary’s Road
London, United Kingdom
@moonandmaybe
Call 07860 441128
September 11

Where to eat and drink on Campus

Whilst you are at uni you obviously have to eat as food is fuel and trust me you will need plenty of fuel in order to complete your studies to the best of your ability.

At the Ealing campus, we have various places to eat,

The Heart  

The Heart, located in the center of our Ealing site, offers a wide-range of fair-trade specialty coffees and tea, drinks and meals including:

  • Breakfast service: a selection of pastries and freshly made toasties.
  • Lunch service: a new approach to designing your own food – including the Heavenly Burger, hand- made pizzas, soup, and pasta. There is also a wide selection of sandwiches, hot jumbo sausage rolls, and jacket potatoes with a filling of the day, puddings, and cold sweets.

All the dishes are made on site using local sustainable and quality products.

Term hours
Monday – Thursday, 8am – 8pm
Friday, 8am – 4pm
Saturday, 8:30am – 3:30pm

 

Feast

Feast serves lunch for students, staff, and visitors at the University’s St Mary’s Road, Ealing site.

All the food is made by our catering students. They serve a variety of lunches, including a fresh salad and pasta bar, soup, a hot menu and vegetarian options, which can be eaten in or taken away, as well as wide selection of fresh fruit and desserts.

Students can get two courses for £5, or three for £6

Staff can get two courses for £5.50, or three for £6.50.

Term hours: Monday – Friday, 11:45am – 1:30pm

Illy Coffee Pod

Located in the reception of St Mary’s Road, the Coffee Pod welcomes you with a selection of luxury hot drinks as well as a range of sandwiches, cakes and snacks.

Term hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 4pm

 

Go’Sasa Deli

Go’Sasa is located in the Street corridor, offering freshly made subs, hot snacks and a grab-and-go selection of snacks and drinks, as well as Starbucks coffee.

Term hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 4pm

 

Freddie’s Coffeehouse

Run by the UWL Students’ Union, Freddie’s Coffeehouse serves Starbucks coffee, fresh sandwiches, wraps and grab-and-go snacks.

Term hours: Monday – Friday, 8am – 6pm

 

Freddie’s Bar

Freddie’s Bar, run by the UWL Students’ Union, serves up fresh food and drinks in a relaxed space.

Term hours: Monday – Friday, 11am – 11pm

 

 

(Information from the UWL portal)

 

September 1

New term

September 1st 2017 in thirteen days I shall return to university for a informal meeting about the rest of my course. I am beyond excited ?

After years of hard work I am now coming to the completion of my course. I shall soon be starting level 6 of my Ba professional cookery course.

In a couple of weeks will begin the Ba Hons part of my course, this will include

  • Food and beverage management
  • Practical hospitality dietary considerations and nutrition for hospitality
  • Business management

http://uwloffice365live-SharePoint.com/…/BA_FPC_Handbook2014-15pdf

I know these modules shall most definitely be hard yet extremely interesting, I am very much looking forward to starting this journey and even more so sharing it with yourselves.

 

Please keep posted and feel free to comment

FOODIE DAN ?☺

February 8

Thinking about becoming a vegan.

As part of my diet and nutrition course we have to look into varied diets, a vegan diet was one of them. Below is a article written by Chris Kresser it’s an interesing read which I thought I would share

 

 

Why You Should Think Twice About Vegetarian and Vegan Diets

by Chris Kresser

There are many reasons why people choose to go vegetarian or vegan. Some are compelled by the environmental impact of confinement animal feeding operations (CAFO). Others are guided by ethical concerns or religious reasons. I respect these reasons and appreciate anyone who thinks deeply about the social and spiritual impact of their food choices—even if my own exploration of these questions has led me to a different answer.

But many choose a vegetarian diet is because they’re under the impression that it’s a healthier choice from a nutritional perspective. It is this reason that I’d like to address in this article. For the last fifty years, we’ve been told that meat, eggs and animal fats are bad for us and that we’ll live longer and enjoy superior health if we minimize or avoid them. This idea has been so thoroughly drilled into our head that few people even question it anymore. In fact, if you asked the average person on the street whether a vegetarian or vegan diet is healthier than an omnivorous diet, they’d probably say yes. But is this really true?

Plant-based diets emphasize vegetables, which are quite nutrient dense, and fruits, which are somewhat nutrient dense. However, they also typically include large amounts of cereal grains (refined and unrefined) and legumes, both of which are low in bioavailable nutrients and high in anti-nutrients such as phytate, and they eschew organ meats, meats, fish and shellfish, which are among the most nutrient-dense foods you can eat.

Vegan diets, in particular, are almost completely devoid of certain nutrients that are crucial for physiological function. Several studies have shown that both vegetarians and vegans are prone to deficiencies in B12, calcium, iron, zinc, the long-chain fatty acids EPA & DHA, and fat-soluble vitamins like A & D.

Let’s take a closer look at each of these nutrients on a vegetarian or vegan diet.

Are plant-based diets missing nutrients required for optimal health? Find out!

Vitamin B12

B12 deficiency is especially common in vegetarians and vegans. The takeaway is that the most recent studies using more sensitive techniques for detecting B12 deficiency have found that 68% of vegetarians and 83% of vegans are B12 deficient, compared to just 5% of omnivores.

Vitamin B12 works together with folate in the synthesis of DNA and red blood cells. It’s also involved in the production of the myelin sheath around the nerves, and the conduction of nerve impulses. B12 deficiency can cause numerous problems, including:

  • Fatigue
  • Lethargy
  • Weakness
  • Memory loss
  • Neurological and psychiatric problems
  • Anemia
  • And much more…

The effects of B12 deficiency on children are especially alarming. Studies have shown that children raised until age 6 on a vegan diet are still B12 deficient years after adding at least some animal products to their diet. In one study, the researchers found:

…a significant association between cobalamin [B12] status and performance on tests measuring fluid intelligence, spatial ability and short-term memory” with formerly vegan kids scoring lower than omnivorous kids in each case.

The deficit in fluid intelligence is particularly troubling, the researchers said, because:

…it involves reasoning, the capacity to solve complex problems, abstract thinking ability and the ability to learn. Any defect in this area may have far-reaching consequences for individual functioning.

A common myth amongst vegetarians and vegans is that it’s possible to get B12 from plant sources like seaweed, fermented soy, spirulina and brewers yeast. But plant foods said to contain B12 actually contain B12 analogs called cobamides that block the intake of, and increase the need for, true B12.

Calcium

On paper, calcium intake is similar in vegetarians and omnivores (probably because both eat dairy products), but is much lower in vegans, who are often deficient. However, calcium bio availability from plant foods is affected by their levels of oxalate and phytate, which are inhibitors of calcium absorption and thus decrease the amount of calcium the body can extract from plant foods. So while leafy greens like spinach and kale have a relatively high calcium content, the calcium is not efficiently absorbed during digestion.

One study suggests that it would take 16 servings of spinach to get the same amount of absorbable calcium as an 8 ounce glass of milk. That would be 33 cups of baby spinach or around 5-6 cups of cooked spinach. There are a few vegetables listed in this paper that have higher levels of bioavailable calcium, but it’s important to note that all of the vegetables tested required multiple servings to achieve the same amount of usable calcium as one single serving of milk, cheese, or yogurt. This suggests that trying to meet your daily calcium needs from plant foods alone (rather than dairy products or bone-in fish) might not be a great strategy.

Iron

Vegetarians eat a similar amount of iron to omnivores, but as with calcium, the bioavailability of the iron in plant foods is much lower than in animal foods. Plant-based forms of iron are also inhibited by other commonly consumed substances, such as coffee, tea, dairy products, supplemental fiber, and supplemental calcium. This explains why vegetarians and vegans have lower iron stores than omnivores, and why vegetarian diets have been shown to reduce non-heme iron absorption by 70% and total iron absorption by 85%.

Zinc

Overt zinc deficiency is not often seen in Western vegetarians, but their intake often falls below recommendations. This is another case where bioavailability is important; many plant foods that contain zinc also contain phytate, which inhibits zinc absorption. Vegetarian diets tend to reduce zinc absorption by about 35% compared with omniovorous diet. Thus, even when the diet meets or exceeds the RDA for zinc, deficiency may still occur. One study suggested that vegetarians may require up to 50% more zinc than omnivores for this reason.

EPA and DHA

Plant foods do contain linoleic acid (omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3), both of which are considered essential fatty acids. In this context, an essential fatty acid is one that can’t be synthesized by the body and must be obtained in the diet. However, an increasing body of research has highlighted the benefits of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids EPA & DHA. These fatty acids play a protective and therapeutic role in a wide range of diseases: cancer, asthma, depression, cardiovascular disease, ADHD, and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

While it is possible for some alpha-linolenic acid from plant foods to be converted into EPA & DHA, that conversion is poor in humans: between 5-10% for EPA and 2-5% for DHA. Vegetarians have 30% lower levels of EPA & DHA than omnivores, while vegans have 50% lower EPA and nearly 60% lower DHA. Moreover, the conversion of ALA to DHA depends on zinc, iron and pyridoxine—nutrients which vegetarians and vegans are less likely than omnivores to get enough of.

Fat-soluble vitamins: A and D

Perhaps the biggest problem with vegetarian and vegan diets, however, is their near total lack of two fat-soluble vitamins: A and D. Fat-soluble vitamins play numerous and critical roles in human health. Vitamin A promotes healthy immune function, fertility, eyesight and skin. Vitamin D regulates calcium metabolism, regulates immune function, reduces inflammation and protects against some forms of cancer.

These important fat-soluble vitamins are concentrated, and in some cases found almost exclusively, in animal foods: primarily seafood, organ meats, eggs and dairy products. Some obscure species of mushrooms can provide large amounts of vitamin D, but these mushrooms are rarely consumed and often difficult to obtain. (This explains why vitamin D levels are 58% lower in vegetarians and 74% lower in vegans than in omnivores.)

The idea that plant foods contain vitamin A is a common misconception. Plants contain beta-carotene, the precursor to active vitamin A (retinol). While beta-carotene is converted into vitamin A in humans, the conversion is inefficient. For example, a single serving of liver per week would meet the RDA of 3,000 IU. To get the same amount from plant foods, you’d have to eat 2 cups of carrots, one cup of sweet potatoes or 2 cups of kale every day. Moreover, traditional cultures consumed up to 10 times the RDA for vitamin A. It would be nearly impossible to get this amount of vitamin A from plant foods without juicing or taking supplements.

But don’t vegetarians live longer than omnivores?

At this point you might be thinking, “Well, so what if plant-based diets are lower in some nutrients. Everyone knows vegetarians live longer than omnivores!” While it’s true that some observational studies suggest that vegetarians and vegans enjoy longer lifespans, these studies were plagued by the “healthy user bias”. The healthy user bias is the scientific way of saying that people who engage in one behavior that is perceived as healthy (whether it is or not) are more likely to engage in other behaviors that are healthy. For example, vegetarians tend to be more health conscious on average than general population; they are less likely to smoke or drink excessively and more likely to exercise, eat fruits and vegetables and take care of themselves.

Of course the flip-side is also true: those that engage in behaviors perceived to be unhealthy are more likely to engage in other unhealthy behaviors. The healthy user bias is one of the main reasons it’s so difficult to infer causality from observational studies. For example, say a study shows that eating processed meats like bacon and hot dogs increases your risk of heart disease. Let’s also say, as the healthy user bias predicts, that those who eat more bacon and hot dogs also eat a lot more refined flour (hot dog and hamburger buns), sugar and industrial seed oils, and a lot less fresh fruits, vegetables and soluble fiber. They also drink and smoke more, exercise less and generally do not take care of themselves very well. How do we know, then, that it’s the processed meat that is increasing the risk of heart disease rather than these other things—or perhaps some combination of these other things and the processed meat?

One way to answer that question is to design a study that attempts to control for at least some of the healthy user bias. In other words, instead of comparing the “average” meat eater (who tends to be less health conscious) with the “average” vegetarian (who tends to be more health conscious), what happens when you compare vegetarians and omnivores that are both health-conscious?

Thankfully, we have a study that did just that. It compared the mortality of people who shopped in health food stores (both vegetarians and omnivores) to people in the general population. This was a clever study design. People who shop in health food stores are more likely to be health conscious, regardless of whether they eat meat, which reduces the likelihood that the study results will be thrown off by the “healthy user bias”. What did the researchers find? Both vegetarians and omnivores in the health food store group lived longer than people in the general population—not surprising given their higher level of health consciousness—but there was no survival difference between vegetarians or omnivores. Nor was there any difference in rates of heart disease or stroke between the two groups. (15) In other words, omnivores who are health conscious live just as long as vegetarians that are health conscious.

Final thoughts

With care and attention, I think it’s possible to meet nutrient needs with a vegetarian diet that includes liberal amounts of pasture-raised, full-fat dairy and eggs, with one exception: EPA and DHA. These long-chain omega fats are found exclusively in marine algae and fish and shellfish, so the only way to get them on a vegetarian diet would be to take a microalgae supplement (which contains DHA) or bend the rules and take fish oil or cod liver oil as a supplement. Still, while it may be possible to obtain adequate nutrition on a vegetarian diet, it is not optimal—as the research above indicates.

I do not think it’s possible to meet nutrient needs on a vegan diet without supplements—and quite a few of them. Vegan diets are low in B12, biovailable iron and zinc, choline, vitamin A & D, calcium, and EPA and DHA. So if you’re intent on following a vegan diet, make sure you are supplementing with those nutrients.

It’s worth pointing out that there are genetic differences that affect the conversion of certain nutrient precursors (like beta-carotene and alpha-linolenic acid) into the active forms of those nutrients (like retinol and EPA and DHA, respectively), and these differences may affect how long someone will be able to follow a vegetarian or vegan diet before they develop nutrient deficiencies. This explains why some people seem to do well for years on these diets, while others develop problems very quickly.

From an evolutionary perspective, is difficult to justify a diet with low levels of several nutrients critical to human function. While it may be possible to address these shortcomings through targeted supplementation (an issue that is still debated), it makes far more sense to meet nutritional needs from food. This is especially important for children, who are still developing and are even more sensitive to suboptimal intake of the nutrients discussed in this article. Like all parents, vegetarians and vegans want the best for their children. Unfortunately, many are not aware of the potential for nutrient deficiencies posed by their dietary choices.

I hope this article can serve as a resource for anyone on a plant-based diet, whether they choose to start eating meat (or animal products, in the case of vegans) again or not.

February 1

New Academic Term

 

Hello and how are you all?I have returned to University after a six month placement at a Cake decorating class course, where I was mentored by the amazing Marcia Campbell in all aspects of being a Cake decorating tutor. I shall upload a separate blog all about that very soon(look out for it ).

So back to classes this term I am studying Professional Cookery currently in my second year, this term I am studying Diet and Nutrition, Business and Hospitality Management alongside Pastry 3.

I must say I am very excited about this year as we will be learning a lot more about the Hospitality industry and the science behind what we eat and how it effects all aspects of our health and life. My modules this year are extremely intense with a high volume of reading material, its going to be intense, its going to be hard however i am so looking forward to every bit of it. Here’s to the second year of my University education CHEERS X

November 14

Artisan Bread Report

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As part of my University diploma my first module in my personal development was write a report on a current food trend. All students were given a few ideas to choose from, I selected Artisan bread as it went alongside my pastry module Artisan breads and fermented goods.

I had never written a report before, an essay yes however a report what on earth was that, I had recently completed my Professional cookery course at college in which I did various assignments practical and written, a report was never required. When studying to be a professional chef 70% of your course is practical, when you get to university level the theory side of things then becomes extremely intense and daunting. I have always enjoyed learning I truly believe that the human brain is an amazing organ and should be utilised to its full potential. As a chef there always something to learn so this first module was certainly a challenge that I revelled in, do not mistake me it was quite possibly the most atrocious report ever yet I look on it fondly as an achievement and a learning curve.

When writing a report you have to use an academic style of writing. What is that I hear you cry ?

“the use of precise and objective language to express ideas. It must be grammatically correct and is more formal than the style used in novels, newspapers, informal correspondence and everyday conversation.”

(McMillan and Weyers, 2007:255)

Students are taught their writing style needs to be: Formal, Precise, Concise, Evidence based, Objective, Referenced, Cautious language, Passive voice, Consistent style.We are taught it should not have the following : Use the 1st person (except in reflection), Address reader as ‘you’, Use ‘we’, Use emotive language, Use slang, Use contractions.A report more importantly should be an informative factual paper written in the third person and must most definitely be referenced.

Putting all this into consideration I got down to work and started writing my report, as I said it was not the best report in the world each time I read it back I cringe. All that being said the best part of my report was the researching.As a college student we given practical’s and theory assessments, I was extremely lucky to have great tutors who always encouraged me to strive for the best learn about my profession and take pride in my work. I took this attitude forward to university which placed me in good stead.

I decided to investigate the history of bread and bread making. The various methods of bread making and baking, different bread recipes, the science behind bread making and fermented goods.20150922_131611The definition of Artisan is one whom is a worker in a skilled trade that involves making things by hand. Artisan bread is bread made by hand in smaller batches rather than being mass produced by a factory.The difference between artisan bread and that of bread that is mass produced is the flavour the quality the taste the texture and the smell most importantly the ingredients

In France people by freshly made bread on a daily basis, there bread shop’s are  known as a boulangerie the definition of boulangerie is a bakery or a place where bread is made. A basic food made from flour water yeast. These simple ingredients have the ability to create a meal for the family have been a food staple for millions of years.

There is a long history of bread it is even referred to in Our Lord’s Prayer. “Give us this day our daily bread.”
Bread is and has been a basic food of everyday life, the communal bread oven was the focal point for many communities as domestic ovens were not universal until 19th Century. In many countries there are still communal ovens where ladies bring their loaves every morning to be cooked and looked after by the town baker, their bread is moulded or marked in order to identify it once ready for its collection. 
The history of bread making dates back to 9000BC leavened bread was invented in 5000BC attributed to the Egyptians whom discover fermentation by accident when a piece of dough had become sour. Some may argue that bread was founded in Iran / Syria /Egyptians/Nordics.

As I started to look into bread the process of bread making the one thing that came up repeatedly was  with bread making it  is about  learning about long fermentation pre fermentation pre ferments autolyse and temperature management. Understanding your ingredients and the science behind how this ingredients works when mixed together.

Managing dough fermentation is to get the best results means finding the perfect balance of rising time proofing time and ambient dough temperature which is 24-27.C The longer the rise there is more opportunity to build flavour and the appropriate amount of acidity. Dough temperature affects the metabolic rate of the yeast warmer yeast develops faster however If the temperature rises beyond 50.C the yeast will die.After dough is mixed yeast replicates until there is no oxygen remaining in the dough at which point the yeast cells as they consume the sugars from the flour begin to produce gases carbon dioxide ethanol sugar in and gas out.

(BFT) Bulk Fermentation Time. This is the first rise of the dough after all the ingredients has been incorporated. Extending the bulk fermentation process is essential in developing flavour to your dough. Less yeast and more time will produce better bread.

 There are varied methods for bread fermentation:

Poolish is a pre-fermentation starter used in bread making and is referred to as an indirect method. It may also be called mother dough.

Biga is a type of pre-ferment used in Italian baking. Many popular Italian types of bread such as ciabatta are made using a Biga. Using a Biga adds complexity to the breads flavour and is often used in breads which need a light open texture with holes

Levain bread recipes makes pungent bubbly culture made from wheat flour whole-wheat + water in 5 days. Pure Levain breads are bread with no commercial yeast.

flour  images-3

Fermentation is the most important part of bread time is the essential key to making great bread. Bread was made thousands and thousands of years ago with natural yeast and is the original artisan bread making we are now bringing that back by making bread with the four main ingredients of bread and  slow fermentation.

Fermentation is caused by yeast a living organism part of the fungi family. It also creates carbon dioxide & alcohol. The alcohol is removed during the baking process.Yeast is a fungus form of plant life available as a fresh or dried product. Fresh yeast should be kept wrapped and in a cool place, it should have pleasant smell and ordered only when it is required as it spoils quickly. It should also crumble easily and should be as fresh as possible.Yeast is rich in protein and Vitamin B. It therefore helps towards building and repairing body and provides protection.

Yeast is used to ferment and leaven dough. It has been used for about 4,000 years. Responsible for the first leaved breads in the evolution of modern baking. The scientific discovery of yeas as a microorganism responsible for fermentation occurred in the mid-19th Century by Louis Pasteur a French Scientist. Methods where later developed for isolating culture pure strains of yeast.

images-4

To make a sour dough loaf you must first start with a culture also known as a starter. Strong flour spelt flour honey warm water Richard Bertinet recipe mix and leave for 48hrs. There are various recipes for starters some people use a fruit like grape or raisin or apple for the acidity some people only use plain strong flour and do not incorporate a whole meal or other flour. It is a living product that needs to be fed on a regular basis and looked after. It is also possible to dry out your starter and create into a powder which instruction for doing so can be found in Richard Bertinet book of dough. There also a thing called a pre ferment which is similar to a starter however it is bread dough made left to rest and added to bread mix. After making bread over 6 weeks at home and at university I have found that fresh yeast is best, the fermentation is much better and the smell and taste well they are superior to dried yeast. Of course there is a place for dried yeast in every kitchen it is an amazing product that gives great results the slapping technique allows you to incorporate air every time you slap down the dough and fold over it allows little air pockets to be created which in return overs you a great dough filled with air which creates the beautiful gas pockets we require to get a great loaf of bread. When shaping your dough and lifting each corner into the middle it gives the dough extra air and strength.

Try baking some bread this weekend I promise you its worth it

 

lots of foodie luv

Dan xxx

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 7

Personal development

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Personal development is a part of the Level 4 culinary course, this module enables students to understand how university works, how and where to retrieve resources for coursework and modules. More importantly the module provides support in developing your personal skills.

The course was run by The Culinary Arts and Learning Support Lecturer Judith Manderioli

It is a Level 4 module, which comprises 200 learning hours. It was delivered in the first semester and was a core module on the BSc Culinary Arts Management Degree and BA. Each module is supported by a MSG module study guide, the MSG is a guide that gives full details of what the course will entail, what is required of you as a student, the coursework involved within the module, the grades that can be obtained and how to best achieve these.

A degree is not about memory recall, but about thinking, learning, evaluating and applying knowledge; you will learn through ‘doing’ and consequently develop your learning skills. Part of the module students are asked to complete a Vark questionnaire in order to establish your personal learning skills style.  

 In order to fully benefit and appreciate the module fully students need to be prepared to take part in classroom discussion, activities as well as self directed studying. The module enables students to open up and develop not only academic skills but personal development skills, teaching us how to interact with others build self confidence, learn how to research relevant academic skills, develop the correct academic writing skills required throughout your time at university and for future reference. Furthermore you will develop team work and communication skills.

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On completion of this module each student should be able to:

1.    Access and demonstrate the use of relevant resources.

2.    Apply the appropriate written communication techniques when analysing information.     

3.    Develop existing skills and acquire new competencies for the hospitality

     environment.

4.  Identify transferable skills necessary for employment.

5.  Present independent research.

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The content of the module is as follows

   Improving communication skills

   Academic writing skills

   Report writing skills

   Research skills

   Referencing

   Effective time management

   Presentation skills

   Group work skills

   Identification of skills

   Preparing PowerPoints

(module study guide 201516)

Assessment 1 (A1): Report on a current trend

My first module assignment was about current food trends, there was a choice between the following,

chilled soups, artisan bread, coffee culture, juice bars, ancient grains. I chose to cover bread as it was also my first module for pastry. The report had to consist of 1500 paying attention to geo-cultural and social influences, growth trends, availability, dietary considerations, target markets, seasonality and sustainability.

Assessment 2 (A2): Presentation of report findings to the class

The second part of the module assessment was to demonstrate communication skills through the use of a PowerPoint presentation to the class summarising the findings from report.  this may be done using a  maximum of 10 slides and the presentation should be no longer than 10 minutes.

I shall be sharing my report as well as my presentation in further blogs more importantly I shall be letting you know how I found it the ups and downs, giving tips and advice.